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Confessions Of A Vintage Magazine Junkie

I recently developed a new interest in something which unfortunately requires a pocket full of money – but then isn’t that true of all good things?

Woman magazine over the years

Woman magazine over the years

I have developed a fondness of collecting vintage women’s magazines. OK, strictly speaking, I suppose I should be using the term retro as the magazines are predominantly from the eighties and nineties but hey I like the word vintage better! And in any case I’m sure that I’ll soon start collecting magazines from decades prior to the eighties. And it’s not just women’s magazines – I’ve also started collecting pop and teen mags from those decades too.

 WHY THE SUDDEN INTEREST?

I have always been a magazine junkie – right from the time I was able to read. As a child I couldn’t go into a newsagents without whoever I was with purchasing a  kid’s magazine for me. And it just went on from there.

As a young teen, I started to keep all the magazines I bought rather than toss them out – proving they really were money well spent. But unfortunately as my collection grew, space became increasingly tight, especially as we were living in a pretty small place at the time. So feeling fed up one day, I threw the lot out, not realising that one day I’d regret that decision.

My interest was sparked when upon arriving home from America, I discovered that my mum had thrown out boxloads of the vintage recipe pages I was saving. I was livid! And that’s putting it very mildly!

Part of my recipe collection

Part of my recipe collection

However during the three months I’d spent in the States, I didn’t buy any magazines as I didn’t really like the selection that was available there (apologies to my American followers!) But then when I arrived back in the UK, I found that my usual weekly reads didn’t really entice me as they once did. I actually found them a bit soul-less. It was just full of ads, celeb gossip, and fashion features of clothes from stores that I don’t frequent. It was all starting to get a little bit dull. The quality just wasn’t there.

I started thinking back to the magazines I used to buy years ago. I loved the extraordinary stories from real life people. I couldn’t get enough of the fiction pages and the puzzles. I loved the homely way the food accompanying the recipes was photographed. I enjoyed the regular weekly features. I also liked how the cover girl was usually an unknown model or at the very least a relevant actor or actress from one if the top soaps of that time. Not a reality TV star in sight!

Woman's Own from the 1980s

Woman’s Own from the 1980s

I began to wish I’d never been so foolish as to throw out my beloved collection of mags – and set about trying to replace them.

WHY ARE THEY SO IMPORTANT TO ME?

Well in a nutshell, it’s because it reminds me of my childhood. Bet you didn’t need me to tell you that! It brings back wonderful memories of going to the newsagent with my uncle and picking up a pack of jelly tots – and a kiddie’s mag which I would read from cover to cover; of going through my aunts’ bags to flick through their latest mag; of going to the shop after school with my friends, where they’d buy a chocolate bar or bag of crisps for the journey home, and I’d buy a ton of chocolate – and a very ‘uncool’ women’s weekly – which I’d always claim was for my mum. Yeah right – Mum was lucky if she even caught sight of it, let alone read it!

I loved best!

I loved best!

I actually believe that these magazines got me prepared for the adult world. Or perhaps I should say that in my very naïve teenage mind, I’d flick those pages and think that that was what being an adult was all about. As I looked at the fashion pages, I’d imagine that those would be the clothes I’d wear when I was all grown up. I’d look at the hair and beauty features, envisioning my chic and elegant future self. The interiors section gave me a lot of inspiration for my future home. I learned a lot from the sometimes unfortunate real-life stories of ordinary people. Furthermore, my love of cooking and interest in food stems from those recipe pages.

And where teen magazines are concerned, they played a major role in my growing up. They answered the questions my friends and I were to afraid ask our parents, teachers and other adults around us; questions about boys, dating, the changes that were rapidly occurring to our bodies, problems at school, fitting in with the crowd… And of course they enabled us to indulge in our teenage crushes, gave us advice on how to do our hair and make-up and gave us tons of freebies. And without Smash Hits, I would never have been able to learn the lyrics to my fave tunes.

 TRACKING THEM DOWN

Well it wasn’t easy, I can tell you that now! But once  I decided to try and track down vintage finds and stop buying modern-day magazines, I had to consider which were the best places to start looking. At first I tried many of the local charity shops but found no joy there, although one of the volunteers did suggest the Freecycle site to me. Unfortunately I had no luck there either. Nor did I find anything at car boot sales.

More recent issues of Woman's Own from within the last ten years

More recent issues of Woman’s Own from within the last ten years

I also tried people I knew who might have the odd mag or two or a hundred going back to the eighties but alas nothing. And I was practically laughed out of the newsagents when I enquired if they had leftover stock from thirty years ago (not as ridiculous as you might think seeing as my parents acquired stock from what seems like thirty thousand years ago when they took over a local shop!)

Finally I checked out sites like Gumtree and eBay which I suppose I should have checked out first. It was slow going but I soon discovered some real gems…

WHAT I GOT

I’m thrilled that in such a short amount of time, I’ve been able to get some really amazing finds. I’ve got a lot of the magazines from the eighties that my mum and aunts used to read such as Woman, Woman’s Own, Women’s Realm, My Weekly and Women’s Weekly. I’ve also got two issues of Bella which I’m thrilled about as well as Prima which were two titles that I – not my aunts – used to buy.

Just a fraction of me Me magazine collection

Just a fraction of me Me magazine collection

Another thing I’m also thrilled about is that I’ve been reunited with a 1990’s mag called Me which I’d totally forgotten about! But flicking through it, the memories came flooding back and it was just as awesome as I remembered.

I never used to buy Essentials and neither did any of the women in my family but after I stumbled across a file containing pages from old-school issues of this publication, I made it a mission to track down some issues – and I haven’t been disappointed.

Essentials from the early nineties

Essentials from the early nineties

But one of the best finds, even though it isn’t a women’s weekly title, were a bundle of Smash Hits magazines from the late eighties to the early nineties – the exact period that I used to buy this fantastic pop magazine. And what I was most excited about was the issue that had the first ever cover of New Kids On The Block on it – the best pop band in the world! Upon contacting the previous owner to thank her, she revealed that she was sad to part with them but as she was a mum with a growing family, she had to let her Smash Hits collection go which made me feel guilty. I promised her that I’d give them a good home – as I will with every mag in my growing collection.

The issue now is (ha! Geddit???) Is how I’m going to haul my collection across the Atlantic to my new home!

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Ten Ice-cream Memories That Will Hopefully Make a Comeback

It’s summertime and it’s absolutely sweltering. I don’t think I’ve ever known it to be so hot (I probably say that every summer!) and I am literally melting away!

On a more positive note, I am definitely gorging on more and more ice-cream in a bid to keep cool, and I suppose I should make the most of it. After all once the hot weather gives way to the cold, I won’t be looking at another ice-cream until next summer.

This got me thinking about the lovely ice-cream treats we used to feast on when we were kids. When we were growing up, ice-cream was not a freezer staple but something Mum got in when we were having a party or a family gathering, so it really was an occasional treat and regarded as something quite special. Back when we were kids, the weather didn’t matter a bit – we would have happily devoured ice-cream in below freezing conditions!

However, I’ve noticed that a lot of the ice-cream treats that were very popular in the ’80s and ’90s – and most probably even before then – seem to be virtually unheard of today, or at the very least they’re not as common. I’ve noticed that twenty-first century ice-cream has been given something of an image overhaul. With an array of flavours and textures, ice-cream nowadays is smoother, slicker and sophisticated and most definitely not just for kids.

But I’ve also noticed however, that despite ice-cream being given something of a revamp, most of the time it’s just an accompaniment to a dessert such as a fruit pie or tart, fudge cake, or waffles etc.

With these old time classics, however, Ice-cream is very much the star of the show.

1. JELLY AND ICE-CREAM

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The classic kids dessert. No child’s birthday party was complete without jelly and ice-cream. I haven’t been to any kids parties for quite some time now but I do hope it still features on the menu. I absolutely loved this as a kid. I didn’t care what flavour the jelly or ice-cream was; as long as one half of the bowl wobbled and the other was icy.  I’m sure jelly and ice-cream were most people’s childhood favourite dessert but while most kids grow out of it, I still have a massive bowlful most weekends as a not-so-little treat. My not-so-guilty pleasure!

2. ICE-CREAM FLOAT

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A glass of soda with a scoop of vanilla ice-cream. My mum introduced me to the delights of an ice-cream float when I was about five. But Hubby was horrified when he heard that Mum used cola and not root beer which he insists was the only soda used in making an ice-cream float in the States. Well over here in England, it was always cola floats – especially as we don’t really get good quality root beer over here. And I’m almost certain that Mum has used cream soda a few times as well. Though whether you use root beer or cola, they’re both equally delicious. I think so anyway! There is now a new trend for sodas and ice-creams of any flavour. Hmmm… don’t know how Hubby will feel about that!

3. ICE-CREAM SANDWICH

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This was an amazing treat when we were growing up. An ice-cream sandwich is a layer of ice-cream sandwiched between two biscuits, cookies, slices of cake, or -as in the ones Mum used to make for us – wafer. Ice-cream sandwiches have been eaten all over the world and most countries have their own version of it. Admittedly it probably wasn’t such a hit for people with sensitive teeth but it was seriously delish. We tended to use mainly vanilla, Neapolitan, or raspberry ripple ice-creams (with the latter being my fave!) Basically ice-creams which were typical of the 1980s.

Now that I think of it, I can’t remember the last time I enjoyed an ice-cream sandwich. Hmmm… time to start buying packs of wafers, I think!

4. ICE-CREAM CUPS WITH LITTLE WOODEN SPOONS

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I haven’t had these in England since childhood but I have stumbled across them when I visited India – and the ice-cream was delicious! These are not to be confused with miniature tubs of ice-cream which are still readily available. The ones I’m referring to were little cardboard or lightweight plastic cups of ice-cream with peel-off paper lids. These were eaten with the little wooden spoons that came with them, although they resembled paddles rather than spoons. The ice-cream was almost always vanilla but I’m sure I vaguely remember vanilla ice-cream that contained ripples of chocolate or strawberry flavoured sauce.

Mini tubs of ice-cream today don’t come the little wooden spoon, and if it does come with a spoon at all, it’s always plastic, which handy as it is, it’s just not the same. I actually think the little wooden spoon made the ice-cream taste better!

5. BANANA SPLIT

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Now who doesn’t like a good ol’ banana split? My aunt used to make a very simple version of this classic dessert which she served as afters during the summer months. Hers consisted of a banana cut into quarters served with vanilla ice-cream. Simple, not quite like the traditional version, but still very appetizing.

The classic version – which originated in Pennsylvania – involves splitting a banana lengthways and placing it in a boat-shaped dish before filling it with three scoops of ice-cream (usually strawberry, chocolate, and vanilla) before being topped with sauces, whipped cream, crushed nuts and a cherry. Many different versions of this dessert exist but one thing remains – it’s unlikely you’ll find anyone who can finish a whole one by themselves!

Banana splits can still be found in ice-cream parlours and diners, but thanks to the emergence of more sophisticated desserts, this retro pud is not as ‘talked about’. In fact three years ago, there were reports that Wimpy had dropped this dessert from their menu due to a fall in demand. Are people mad?

6. KNICKERBOCKER GLORY

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At the mere mention of a Knickerbocker Glory I’m immediately transported back to the 1980s. Another retro dessert like the banana split, a Knickerbocker Glory is an ice-cream sundae served in a tall glass which contains layers of fruit, ice-cream, jelly, cream, nuts, meringue, sauces or syrups. This dessert is as peculiar to Britain as the banana split is to America, and has been served up in ice-cream parlours across Britain since the 1930s. There is no set recipe for making a Knickerbocker Glory and flavours can vary. This was another dessert which didn’t survive the cull at Wimpy and was cut along with the banana split three years ago.

There are some things I will never understand…

7. ARCTIC ROLL

Image from dailymail.co.uk

Image from dailymail.co.uk

I must have been about seven when a friend told me that she was going to have an Arctic roll for dessert after her tea. I had no idea what an Arctic roll was at the time – but I soon found out!

An Arctic roll is similar in appearance to a Swiss roll. It’s made of vanilla ice cream wrapped in a thin layer of sponge cake to form a roll, with a layer of raspberry flavoured sauce or jam between the sponge and the ice cream. This dessert was invented in Britain by a Czech lawyer who had emigrated here, and it has been around since the 1950s, though it became extremely popular during the 1970s.

Since being enlightened by my friend, my family and I had worked our way through quite a few Arctic rolls in our time, with the pud being a firm favourite with Mum. Production of the Arctic roll ceased for a while, beginning in the 1990s due to a slump in sales, but it resurfaced again in 2008 due to a combination of low-cost and nostalgic charm. Reviews were mixed with some regarding the dessert as too old-fashioned while the nostalgics among us welcomed it’s return. Despite it still being available to buy – with chocolate versions available as well – it’s not as popular as it once was. But at least it’s still here!

8. ICE CREAM IN A CARDBOARD BLOCK

lyons-maid-ice-cream-block

Those of us old enough to remember, will know that back in the day ice-cream didn’t come in rectangular plastic tubs, or  cylindrical tubs a la Haagen-Dazs or Ben and Jerry’s. No, instead was available in the form of a block and wrapped in a cardboard container. Flavours tended to be vanilla, strawberry, chocolate, raspberry ripple or Neapolitan – the flavours of the day. As you can imagine, a cardboard wrapper wasn’t very practical: if you didn’t get your shopping home fast enough on a hot day, the ice-cream would melt and start to seep out of the packet. The softened ice-cream would also be at risk of being squished by heavier goods. Furthermore, if you were able to get the ice-cream home in one piece,  it was best eaten once opened, as it was impossible to seal properly and the ice-cream would develop a layer of frost in the freezer. My mum especially liked the ice-cream that came in tubs because she could store things in them after the ice-cream had long been devoured.

But there’s something extremely nostalgic about the old block-form ice-cream – and they did have their advantages: less waste and you could cut the perfect slice to put into your ice-cream sandwich. I very much doubt it’s available in the UK anymore although, I have seen them abroad – so there’s a chance that they could make they’re way back to these shores again.

9. ICE-CREAM BOMBES

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This dessert is believed to have originated during the Victorian era and it’s got something of a retro vibe. Also known as a bombe glacee, this ice-cream pud is frozen in a spherical mould so it resembles a dome, and they sometimes had a hard chocolate shell. I don’t remember Mum ever making these but I do remember her buying packs of these from Iceland (when the frozen food chain started springing up everywhere) so we clearly enjoyed them. I also remember tucking into these during an extended-family meal in a restaurant when I was about eight. It was mint flavoured ice-cream which I was crazy about at the time, served with fresh cream. Yum!
10.BAKED ALASKA

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As far as I’m concerned, Baked Alaska is the queen of ice-cream puddings. A very decadent-looking ice-cream dessert which generally consisted of ice-cream and fruit on a cake base, covered in meringue before being browned in the oven. And here’s the amazing bit – the ice-cream doesn’t melt! Baked Alaska was a very popular dessert when I was growing up and although it’s been virtually unheard of for at least fifteen years, I’m thrilled to see that Marks and Spencer have brought out their version of this classic dessert.

AND FINALLY…

I must say though, that one memory I’m glad has become a very distant one is that delightful combo of vanilla ice-cream with… tinned fruit salad! When I was a child I was obsessed with tinned fruit salad. In fact my mum used to say it was the only time I would go near a piece of fruit. I remember for school dinners, desert would sometimes consist of tinned fruit and custard (which I thought was yum!) But our family gatherings and parties weren’t any better: dessert was almost always tinned fruit and vanilla ice-cream. Don’t get me wrong; at the time I thought it was fab. But then I hadn’t developed the sophisticated palate that I have now! I have no aversion to fruit and ice-cream only now I insist on using fresh fruit rather than opening a tin.

Now if only we could bring back the other old classics…

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Comfort Food #2: Magical Baked Alaska

To say that I have a bit of a sweet tooth is like saying Mary Berry does a bit of baking! And one thing that I’m a huge fan of is that logic defying dessert – Baked Alaska. I love the layered combination of cake, ice-cream and (occasionally) fruit all topped with meringue of the soft, fluffy, marshmallowy variety.

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Baked Alaska is a retro classic and was a big hit when I was growing up in the 1980s – though I believe it first became popular a decade earlier. Cooking shows I used to watch with Mum would show viewers how to create a Baked Alaska; women’s magazines my aunts used to buy would always contain recipes for the dessert and I loved seeing the different variations. I may have only been a kid but even I knew that no dinner party was complete without this sweet finale.

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From a child’s point of view, there was something extremely magical about this dessert. Whoever heard of an ice-cream that could be baked in the oven and come out intact and not as ice-cream soup? It was only when I was at secondary school and began home economics classes that I understood why the ice-cream didn’t melt (OK – here comes the science bit!): the meringue acted as an effective insulator, and the short cooking time (just long enough to bake the meringue) prevents the heat from getting through to the ice cream.

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But from being everywhere, it’s now seldom heard of. It’s very rarely served up at dinner parties; I don’t hear about anyone tucking into a Baked Alaska anymore and it doesn’t appear on restaurant menus. In fact, the last time I heard of anyone serving up a Baked Alaska was at the wedding of a family friend – and she got married back in 1990!

However that doesn’t mean that it’s suddenly ceased to be delicious so it’s about time that this unique and long forgotten dessert made a comeback.

Here’s a very delightful sounding recipe that I found from Mark Sargeant for a modern take on an old favourite. Baked Alaska has never sounded so good and I for one cannot wait to try it!

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Ingredients

For the sponge
5 free-range eggs
150 g caster sugar
110 g plain flour
40 g cocoa powder
25 g butter, melted, plus extra for greasing

For the ice cream
250 g plain chocolate
100 g unsalted butter
150 g caster sugar
150 ml water
4 large eggs, yolks only
500 ml double cream

For the meringue
100 ml water
400 g sugar
2 tbsp liquid glucose, (optional)
6 egg whites
1 vanilla pod, seeds scraped out

For the cherry sauce
300 g cherries, stones removed, halved, plus 12 extra whole with stalks for decoration
2 tbsp caster sugar
A cordial of cherries
A splash of kirsch

To serve
kirsch, for drizzling and flambéing
½ shell of eggs, washed and dried

Method
1. Preheat the oven to 220C/200C fan/gas 7. Grease and line a 24x20cm/9.5x8in lipped baking tray.

2. For the sponge: cream the eggs and sugar together in a large bowl for 4-5 minutes until pale and fluffy.

3. Sift the flour and cocoa powder into the egg and sugar mixture and fold until combined, then stir in the melted butter. Pour the mixture into the prepared baking tray and bake for 18-20 minutes, or until the cake is risen and is springy to the touch.

4. Remove from the oven and allow to cool briefly in the tray before turning out onto a wire rack to cool completely.

5. For the ice cream: place the chocolate and butter in a heatproof bowl set over a pan of just-simmering water (make sure the water doesn’t touch the bottom of the bowl). Stir continuously, until the chocolate has melted and the mixture is smooth and glossy. Set aside.

6. Place the sugar and water into a small saucepan set over a low heat, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Increase the heat and bring to the boil, cooking for a few minutes until the mixture thickens to a syrup consistency. Set aside to cool for one minute.

7. Place the egg yolks in a heatproof bowl set over a pan of just-simmering water (make sure the water doesn’t touch the bottom of the bowl). While whisking continuously, slowly trickle in the hot sugar syrup. When all of the sugar syrup has been incorporated and the mixture has thickened, whisk in the double cream and the melted chocolate mixture until smooth.

8. Pour the mixture into the bowl of an ice cream machine and churn according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Scoop the churned ice cream into a rectangular container, smoothing the top, and place into the freezer. Remove from the freezer 5-10 minutes before serving.

9. For the meringue: place the water, sugar and glucose (if using) into a heavy-based saucepan. Place over a medium heat, stirring frequently, until the mixture comes to the boil. Increase the heat to high and boil until the mixture reaches 121C (check using a sugar thermometer), then quickly remove from the heat.

10. Beat the egg whites and vanilla seeds in a stand mixer, then carefully pour the sugar syrup onto the beaten egg whites in a thin stream, taking care not to let the syrup run onto the whisks or the edge of the bowl. Continue to beat at a low speed until the mixture is almost completely cold – this will take about 10 minutes. Spoon the meringue into a piping bag and set aside.

11. For the cherry sauce: place all of the cherry sauce ingredients into a pan and cook over a medium heat until the cherries are tender (add a splash of water if the mixture looks too dry). Transfer the mixture to a food processor and blend to a smooth puree. Pass the sauce through a fine sieve.

12. To assemble the baked Alaska, cut two equal-sized rectangles from the sponge. Cut the ice cream into a brick shape the same length and width as the sponge.

13. Place one sponge rectangle onto a serving plate and drizzle with kirsch, then smooth over some of the cherry sauce. Top with the ice cream, then the other sponge to make a ‘sandwich’. Pipe the meringue all over the ‘sandwich’ to cover, making sure it is completely covered.

14. Using a mini blowtorch, brown the meringue all over. Place the whole cherries around the base of the meringue to decorate. Pour some kirsch into the egg shell and press into the top of the meringue. Carefully ignite the kirsch just before serving.

 

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Top Twenty Sweet Treats From My Childhood

I offered one of my work colleagues some Fruitellas and the next thing we knew we’d started naming all the old fashioned retro sweets we loved as kids and I was right back in my favourite place – taking a trip down memory lane! In a world dominated by KitKat, Twix and Snickers (Marathon back in the day!) I wondered where a lot of my old favourites have gone. Some have ended up in the great sweet shop in the sky but many are still available – but for some reason not so heavily advertised and not stocked in as many stores.

So taking inspiration from the great Russell Deasley, here’s my very own Top Twenty (Top Ten just wasn’t an option!) list of all the yummy sugary snacks I used to OD on!

1. Banjo

Available since 1976 until the mid 1980s, I sometimes wonder if I dreamt up this chocolate bar as it was discontinued in record time and never mentioned again! One minute I was being treated to a bar of Banjo every time I went to Tesco with my mum, the next minute it had earned a place in chocolate heaven. Banjo was a milk chocolate covered twin bar with a chopped peanut layer and could be considered a distant (and not so successful) cousin of Twix and Drifter. Packaged in a navy blue and yellow wrapper, it was one of the first choccy  bars to have a heat-sealed wrapper instead of the reverse-side fold which was common back then. Apparently there was also a coconut version in a red wrapper available although I cannot for the life of me remember it!

2. Wrigley’s Opal Fruits

Heavily advertised throughout the 1980s, these fruity cuboid shaped sweets were once a permanent fixture in the duffel coated pockets of many an infant school child who would happily swap the ones they couldn’t stand for they ones they liked (for me it was the dreadful orange ones.) I remember that distinctive yellow packaging and these are actually still in existence although they have been rebranded as Starburst. However, it doesn’t seem the same – who ever heard of Starburst: made to make your mouth water?

3. Rowntree’s Jelly Tots

 

I love these plump, round little sugar coated jellies that resemble tablets. They may be aimed at children but that’s fine by me as they bring out the (big) kid in me! Launched in 1967, they are still on sale today which surprises me because I don’t know anyone else who buys these except me. You’ll know I’ve finished a packet because there will only be the orange ones that are left!

4. Fry’s Turkish Delight

 

This is still a very firm favourite of mine and as a kid I was mesmerised by the gorgeous and distinctive amethyst and fuschia metallic wrapper. My fascination with the very gaudy (Hubby’s words not mine!) yet eye catching packaging didn’t diminish as I entered adulthood as it is my ultimate favourite colour combination and served as inspiration for when I redesigned my room!

I was surprised to learn that Fry’s Turkish Delight has been around since 1914. I love the unique concept of a rose flavoured jelly enrobed in delicious milk chocolate. I used to watch the rather sensual advert for this chocolate bar as I was watching daytime television with my mum after playschool! The slogan “Full of Eastern Promise” is still ringing in my ears and I only wish more shops would promise to stock up this yummy treat.

5. Nestlé’s Caramac

 

A very unusual concept, it was not a chocolate bar so much as a caramel flavoured bar, made using condensed milk, butter and sugar and packaged in a distinctive red and yellow wrapper. This was a treat that could only be tolerated in small doses: initially it’s quite tasty but too much of it and it becomes quite sickly. It’s still a great reminder of back in the day and apparently it’s back in production although I have yet to set eyes on a bar of Caramac second time around!

6. Chewits

 

Still very much in demand today as it was way back when, these chewy sweets were first launched in 1965. Since then, there have been a whole host of delicious flavours over the years including blue mint, rhubarb and custard, cola and tutti frutti but I don’t recall ever trying the banana flavoured ones which sound like they would have been right up my street! In 2009, there was even an online petition to relaunch the ice-cream flavoured Chewits due to public demand expressed on various social networking sites. If only the same thing could work for world peace!

7. Barratt’s Black Jack

 

I wouldn’t have called this a sweet treat so much as a sweet torture! It’s exactly the kind of thing you’d give to somebody you covertly didn’t like. I hated the strong aniseed flavour and even today I don’t think I could ever acquire a taste for it. However, a lovely family friend always used to buy my sister and I bumper packs of sweets which contained the dreaded Blackjacks so in an odd kind of way, even though I cannot stand the taste, it’s a wonderful reminder of a simpler time and a super sweet lady!

8. Barratt’s Fruit Salad Chews

 

Similar in concept to the awful Black Jacks; also contained in the bumper sweet packs, but these pineapple and raspberry flavoured fruit chews were definitely more palatable. I wonder what the nutritional value of these are considering it may be the closest most kids got to a fruit salad! Definitely pre-Jamie Oliver era.

9. Barratt’s Refreshers

 

These resembled those fizzy effervescent vitamin tablets my dad used to dissolve in water every night. Each pack contained a delicious range of fruit flavours which were fizzy on the tongue and we loved the tangy, slightly bubbling sensation as it fizzled away to nothing. That’s if we didn’t impatiently crunch the whole in two seconds flat before reaching for another one!

10. Fruitella

 

The inspiration behind this list! Although it was very similar to Chewits, I preferred Fruitella due to it’s softer texture and more natural flavours, and they do indeed contain real fruit juice and natural colours. My favourite is definitely the English Fruit variety and there isn’t a single fruit flavour in that pack I dislike. Very unusual for me. Back in 2007,  Fruitella brought out a  flavoured chocolate range that was discontinued due to an intense lack of popularity.

11. Barratt’s Sherbet Fountain

 

Consisting of fizzy sherbet and a liquorice stick, Sherbet Fountain underwent a bit of a revamp back in 2009 when the packaging was updated with a plastic tube complete with twist-off lid. Call me old fashioned but I preferred the traditional paper packaging complete with a little bit of the liquorice stick poking out at the end – even if you did end up with a bit of a mess by the time you got to the end! Despite comments I have made about loathing the taste of anything aniseedy, I couldn’t get enough of Sherbet Fountain and dread to think how many I must have got through a week. I suppose there’s a lot to be said for the combination of liquorice and sherbet.

I didn’t know it at the time but apparently you were supposed to bite the top of the hollow liquorice stick and the sherbet was then sucked through it like a straw. I suppose it’s hardly a huge surprise as the ‘Fountain’ bit is something of a give away! However, this is not possible with the new updated version as the liquorice stick is solid.

12. Refreshers

 

Swizzels Matlow always strike confectionary gold with every product they launch and Refreshers (not to be confused with one by Barratt) is no exception. A lemon flavour chewy bar that contains fizzy sherbet, it’s still available today and it’s just not safe when I’m around! Bite sized chews are also available as is a strawberry flavoured version.

13. Barratt’s  Dip Dab

 

I had quite a penchant for sherbet products by Barratt throughout my childhood. Dib Dab was equally as delicious as Sherbet Fountain and I worked my way through quite a few packs of these on a weekly basis – as did most kids of the 70s and 80s. Similar to the Fountain variety except that it came with a yummy lolly instead of liquorice stick for dipping.

14. Nerds

 

I was quite partial to the watermelon flavour and these little candy coated pieces of flavoured rock sugar was a huge deal among my little friends back in the 80s. I loved the fact that this came in a box which had separate compartments for two different flavours. However the novelty soon wore off after I gorged on so many that I felt sick. A great reminder of my era though.

15. Drumstick

 

By the same people who brought us the chewy Refreshers bars, Drumsticks are chewy raspberry and milk flavoured sweets on sticks – chewy lollies! We used to raid the sweet shops after school for handfuls of these. The wrapper has undergone something of a revamp but the iconic yellow, red and green colours have not changed. A larger sized chewy bar is also available.

16. Rowntree’s Tooty Frooties

 

In a world where most bite size candies were round, the square shape of these individual fruit flavoured sweets definitely stood out from the crowd. They weren’t my favourite but I loved look of the colourful crisp candy coated sweets and the surprisingly chewy texture. They are a reminder of my childhood and I shall love Rowntree’s Tooty Frooties forever for that alone!

17. Rowntrees’ Fruit Gums

 

As much as I loved Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles, I also had a liking for Rowntree’s Fruit Gums. These circular, fruit flavoured sweets were a cross between wine gums and fruit pastilles but without the sugar coating. Like the fruit pastilles, they were available in both roll packaging and larger volume boxes where the sweets are fruit shaped rather than circular. I’m not quite sure what my fascination with fruit gums were because I remember how difficult they were to chew; my teeth would be stuck tight together! Whereas the pastilles have endured, the popularity of the fruit gums have somehow faded over the years.

18. KP’s  Choc Dips

 

Being a typical kid, it wasn’t enough for sweets to be yummy; they also had to have the added novelty factor. And KP’s Choc Dips certainly had that. Whipping off the lid of a tub of Choc Dips would reveal two compartments: one containing crispy biscuit sticks and the other containing a yummy chocolate dip. The biscuits were so delicious that they could be eaten without the dip which was just as well because there was never enough chocolate! A toffee version was also launched and much later, one with a white chocolate dip. Both chocolate dips are still available today but what ever happened to the toffee dip?

19. Dolly Mixtures

 

The most iconic of candies, Dolly Mixtures consist of various multi-coloured fondant shapes, such as cubes and cylinders, soft sweets and sugar-coated jellies. I loved the appearance of the individual candies and the combination of pretty colours and interesting shapes definitely appealed to the girly girl in me. However, I found it incredibly hard to work my way through even a small packet of these as they were far too sweet. And coming from me, that’s saying something!

20. Double Dip

 

Produced  by the godfather of confectionary, Swizzels Matlow, all the cool kids were into Double Dip back in the late 1980s! It’s UPS was a sachet of two fruit flavoured sherbet powders (orange and cherry. Yes, we’re back with the sherbet again!) and a lemon flavoured swizzle stick for dipping. I’m pleased to see that Double Dip isn’t totally off the candy scene but it’s popularity has definitely erm, dipped. Since the original Double Dip hit our shelves, there have been other variations launched, such as the addition of a cola flavoured sherbet and Swizzels have even combined Double Dip with their other big seller Love Hearts to produce Love Hearts Dip.

 
3 Comments

Posted by on March 30, 2013 in Nostalgia Tastes Like This!

 

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