RSS

Monthly Archives: August 2013

Comfort Food #10: Bread and Butter Pudding

300px-Bread_and_Butter_Pudding_and_Custard

Hubby and I were watching a recent episode of our guilty pleasure, Celebrity Masterchef, and we were amazed to see that the lovely Les Dennis totally messed up when it came to making a simple bread and butter pudding. Now I may never qualify as a contestant in any future series’ of Masterchef but I do know how to make a decent bread and butter pudding and have been doing so since I was twelve!

bb1

Not to be confused with bread pudding, bread and butter pudding is real comfort stodge at it’s best; a delicious combination of sliced, white, buttered bread, raisins and baked egg custard. Crispy on the outside while soft and creamy on the inside, it sounds incredibly basic but it tastes delicious and is one of my father’s favourite puddings. Not only is it inexpensive and easy to prepare but as in bread pudding, it’s a great way of using up leftover bread. It’s a traditional British classic and is usually served with custard, double cream or evaporated or condensed milk. it goes down a treat on a cold winter’s evening!

bb2

The origins of this great British dessert are believed to date back to around the early seventeenth century, although John Nott wrote down one of the earliest recipes for a bread and butter pudding  in 1723. The poor – not wanting to throw out any leftover bread – would steam it with fruit or even meat. An early form of this pudding was known as a whitepot and could be made using bone marrow (yum!) and sometimes substituted the bread for rice thus initiating the process of another nursery dessert, the rice pudding. However, with the introduction of new foods from abroad, people became more inventive and started adding spices and various types of fruit. Milk, eggs and sugar soon became more accessible and affordable for most people and the pudding as we know it today was beginning to take shape.

bb3

The basic recipe remained the same until the latter part of the twentieth century when the popularity of this dessert was beginning to fade. However, many celebrity chefs who have a real love for British cuisine have revamped the humble bread and butter pudding, adding their own spin on a classic showing that many variations of this traditional pudding are possible.

bb4

Bread and butter pudding is still fairly popular today, although I have yet to see a classic version of this dessert in a restaurant menu. I have come across the brioche version which I suppose is a little more sophisticated and updated. Here’s a recipe for a delicious, classic, bread and butter pudding by Elaine Lemm. It’s so easy and tastes soooo good!

breadbutterpud500

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Serves 4
Heat the oven 355°F/180°C/Gas 4.

Ingredients:

  • 50g / 2 oz soft butter
  • 10 slices soft white bread, cut diagonally across or any of the other breads mentioned above
  • 50g / 2 oz golden raisins/sultanas
  • ¼ tsp. freshly grated nutmeg
  • ¼ tsp cinnamon
  • 350 ml / 12 fl oz milk
  • 50 ml / 2 fl oz double / heavy cream
  • 2 large free range eggs
  • 25g / 1 oz white sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract or paste (see note below)

Preparation:

  • Grease a 2 pint/1 litre pie dish with a little of the butter. Spread each of the bread triangles with butter.

  • Cover the base of the pie dish with overlapping triangles of bread, butter side up. Sprinkle half the golden raisins/sultanas evenly over the bread, then lightly sprinkle with a little nutmeg and cinnamon. Repeat this layer one more time or until the dish is filled, finishing with the raisins on top.
  • In a saucepan gently heat the milk and cream – DO NOT BOIL.
  • In a large baking bowl beat the eggs with 3/4 sugar and the vanilla extract until light and airy and pale in color. Pour the warm milk over the eggs and continue beating until all the milk is added.
  • Pour the egg mixture slowly and evenly over the bread until all the liquid is added. Gently press the surface with your hand to push the bread into the liquid. Sprinkle the remaining sugar over the surface then leave to one side for 30 mins.
  • Bake the pudding in the hot oven for 40 – 45 mins, until the surface is golden brown and the pudding well risen and the egg is set. Serve hot.

bb5

VARIATIONS
Another great thing about this pudding is that you can vary the recipe in countless ways so you can have a different version bread and butter every day of the year and never get bored!

bb6

Try:

  • soaking the dried fruit in brandy or rum overnight.
  • using alternatives to sultanas or raisins. Dried cranberries and prunes work very well. My favourite are dried apricots.
  • substitute the dried fruit for chocolate chips; layer some fresh orange segments between the bread, and add some orange zest to the custard for a yummy chocolate and orange bread and butter pudding.
  • fresh fruit  instead of dried.
  • adding a splash of Baily’s to the custard.
  • adding some cocoa to the custard mix to give your pudding a chocolate flavour.
  • cinnamon-infused milk, vanilla extract or paste or ground nutmeg work well in adding flavour.

bb7

Who said you can only use sliced, white bread? And why shouldn’t you throw in some kind of fruit conserve or spread for added flavour? The following are examples of great flavour combinations:

  • Brioche and apricot jam.
  • Pannetone and orange marmalade.
  • Granary bread and black cherry jam.
  • Wholemeal bread with peanut butter, chocolate spread and sliced bananas (the Elvis bread and butter pudding!)
  • Croissant and lemon curd.

imagesCA4D61VP

Finally, you can use stale or fresh bread to make this dessert but I find that bread that is slightly stale gives a more pleasant texture.

Happy eating!

gingham-apron-pie-lady2.jpg

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Farmhouse Kitchen: Comfort Food Television

farmhousekitchen

My love of cookery shows goes back to when I was about five years old, thanks to my mum who was a huge fan of any program that showed you how and what to cook. She would watch every single one religiously and would sit there making notes. As a result, I developed an interest in them too.

My absolute favourite – of which I still have fond memories – is the iconic (in my opinion at least) Farmhouse Kitchen. This was a cookery series made by Yorkshire Television and broadcast by ITV during weekday afternoons. I used to watch it with Mum when I returned home from school. The show was aimed at housewives and homemakers and provided demonstrations of well-known, traditional British fare long before anyone had ever heard of sun-dried tomatoes, balsamic vinegar and salted caramel.

ds

Farmhouse Kitchen was first shown in 1971 and ran until 1989. It was originally  presented by Dorothy Sleightholme until her sad demise in a car accident. Grace Mulligan then took over as the show’s host. There were also occasionally  guest cooks which included Pauline Sykes and the queen of cakes herself, Mary Berry. Viewers were even invited to write in with their own recipes which were then (if selected) demonstrated for the viewing public.

Grace Mulligan

Grace Mulligan

If ever there was such a thing as comfort food television, then this would be it. No fuss, no frills, no obscure ingredients; just simple and inexpensive old-fashioned home cooking. There was something so warm and homely about Farmhouse Kitchen from the country style kitchen to the presenters to the very melodic theme tune. In fact every time I hear that theme tune, it takes me back… It contains a kind of nostalgic 1970s charm and was aptly called ‘Fruity Flute’ and was played by The Reg Wale Group.

fkb

I know that times change and nothing lasts forever but I can’t help but compare this legendary show to cooking programs today where the food and art of cooking sometimes takes second place to cultivating a celebrity image and television career for the chef. And let’s not even get started on the expletives used by certain unnamed chefs and celebrity cooks in a bid to look, I don’t know, cool? Because I don’t think cool, funny or entertaining when I hear it. Just get on with showing us how to cook!

Baked goodies On Farmhouse Kitchen

Baked goodies On Farmhouse Kitchen

It’s a shame that Farmhouse Kitchen isn’t repeated or that there’s anything that remotely resembles it but no doubt if there was the majority of viewers would consider it quaint and outdated – which I suppose goes to show that I like quaint and outdated! Books were available which accompanied the series and I would love to buy a copy.

Here’s that delightful theme tune (the theme had been revamped although judging by some of the comments I’ve read, it would appear that most people preferred the original.) I could listen to it all day and never tire of it. Bliss!

gingham-apron-pie-lady2.jpg

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 25, 2013 in Name That Tune!, TV Shows

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Greengages Are Back!

Greengages

Greengages

 

I recently wrote a post about greengages and gooseberries; two delicious types of fruit we used to grow in our garden when I was a child. The mere mention of either fruit brings back many happy memories of childhood summers spent playing in the garden; outdoor family get-togethers during the sunny season, and gathering bowlfuls of scrumptious fruit. Sadly, both greengages and gooseberries are so scarce that some people have never even heard of them let alone tried them.

 

m&S

 

So imagine my surprise when on a recent jaunt to Marks and Spencer’s, I came across stacks of yummy looking greengages. I didn’t hesitate to snap up a pack – I would have snapped up more but wanted to try them first to see if they were exactly as I remembered them to be. And they were! the greengages were deliciously sweet with that distinctive, delicate flavour I remembered so well.

The only problem was that they were so scrummy that I scoffed the lot before I could even consider attempting the recipes that were featured in the post!

Good old M&S! Now all I need is for them to bring back gooseberries!

Check out this article in Mail Online going back to September 2011. It appears that Marks and Spencers have been trying to get us reacquainted with this retro fruit for a while. I especially love the comment from the reader who says it’s time to bring back gooseberries – I swear it isn’t me!

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2035777/Greengages-fight-way-flavour-outsell-apricots-25-cent.html

 

gingham-apron-pie-lady2.jpg

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Supermodels Rocked The 90s!

 

Victoria’s Secret Angels are stunning and you’d be able to see that even without 20/20 vision! However when it comes to the catwalk queens of yesterday, I’m sorry but todays models couldn’t hold a candle to them – and the lashings of hair lacquer has nothing to do with it! Cindy, Christy, Claudia and co. are the original cover girls whose names were on everyone’s lips. Back in the 1990s, the Supermodel phenomenon was really taking off. Cindy Crawford said in an interview that she hated the term ‘Supermodel’ but love it or hate it, that’s what they were. Teenage girls used to stick posters of models up on their walls and fall asleep every night, dreaming of being discovered as a model and following in the footsteps of their idols. Teenage boys used to stick posters of models up on their walls and fall asleep every night dreaming of discovering a girl who looked like their pin up and following in her footsteps all the way to her front door!

I was madly in love with New Kids On The Block and couldn’t find a pop band to measure up when they disbanded, so I didn’t move on to the ‘next big thing’ as most teenage girls did. Therefore supermodels became my pop stars. My interest (or obsession depending on how you looked at it) began when I was about thirteen and I started reading my school friend’s fashion magazines. It wasn’t long before I was buying my own. I loved learning about fashion, the industry, the designers but most of all the princesses of the runway. It was a great way to discover what Naomi, Elle and their friends were up to.

Their wasn’t a single supermodel whose height, eye colour and vital stats I didn’t know. I knew how they were discovered; where they came from; which agency they were with; their interests etc. I even looked forward to watching the World Music Awards held in Monaco every year because of the numerous appearances made by supermodels – and of course I looked forward to the musical appearances! I watched every documentary about the fashion industry and modelling reality TV shows such as Babewatch and Model Behaviour. and I was always happiest when I saw that the latest edition of Top Model was available.

It might sound that as a teenage girl, I had an unhealthy obsession with the whole industry. I can understand that; if I had a teenage daughter, I might be worried. But looking at photos of models didn’t make me want to starve myself. If anything I ate even more – and living without sugar was not an option! I daydreamed about gracing the cover of Vogue, but I knew I was far from model material. I think I was in awe of the lifestyle. I knew that modelling was hard work and that models lived on a plane and were sleep deprived but there were tons of positives: meeting super-hot rock stars; freebies from designers; appearing in music videos; the chance to travel the world; owning a fabulous apartment, and the opportunity to branch out into acting, presenting, design, launching products etc. There’s no denying it; the supermodel lifestyle was fabulous and laden with opportunities.

But it wasn’t just their looks and lifestyles I admired (OK envied!) but their brains as well. That’s right, brains. Most people might think that models have lip-gloss for brains but in order to be a supermodel, there was no way you could rise to the top unless you had something in your head. They had to have good business acumen; successfully liaise with designers and clients;  launch products; realise great opportunities, and start to make the move into other areas, whether it’s acting, photography or another part of the fashion industry – unfortunately the only thing short about models is their shelf life! it also helps a great deal if their bilingual as there is a great deal of travel and international dealings involved. I read an interview with Czech supermodel, Eva Herzigova, where she revealed that when she first got into modelling, someone would ask her in English for her name and she would just nod though she is now fluent in French and English. Go Eva! In a nutshell, you had to be more than just a clothes horse – you had to be a brand.

I can’t decide who my favourite supermodel was. Could it have been Nadja Auermann, known for having the longest legs in the business? Or Karen ‘smoulder’ Mulder? Or maybe the talented Veronica Webb who showed that models could do more than just pose in front of the camera? Ms. Crawford, the original supermodel businesswoman? Or the wholesome, sweet-as-apple-pie Nikki Taylor? Perhaps I just loved all of them!

There’s no denying that today’s models are beautiful and work just as hard. But I know that they’re successful top models, I don’t feel they are Supermodels – not like the supermodels that I grew up with and admired. The Supers of my generation had that certain something that generated a tanker-load of interest. Most teenagers I know hardly mention models. I really do believe that the Supermodel phenomenon is a thing of the past and a key element of the decade that was the 1990s.

 

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Bella! Where Did You Go?

Dear Editor of Bella

One of my absolute favourite magazines was Bella. I first started buying it when I was twelve, back in the 1990s (yes, twelve) although I would always pretend it was for my mum so that I didn’t get a ribbing from my mates. The truth was Mum was lucky if she even got to see the front cover. It was on sale every Thursday, and I have fond memories of popping over to the paper shop that was across the road from the school at the end of the school day and buy a copy. I couldn’t wait to get home and read it from cover to cover. I can’t quite explain what the appeal was. There was something quite grown up about buying a magazine aimed at women at such a young age – and let’s face it – we all want to be grown up when we’re in our early teens! The crafts and cookery pages appealed to the creative side of me, and I loved collecting the recipe ‘cards’ – a page which contained cut out and keep recipes.

bella-logo

 

There were certain features I would read religiously. Precious Moments, where readers wrote in describing touching moments in their lives; Talking Point always raised interesting topics such as remaining a virgin until you were married or not being hired because you were too attractive (hmmm… come to think of it, the lady in that feature did look a lot like a young Samantha Brick…) My Own Story, which was a double page feature detailing a heart-rending moment in a reader’s life. I liked reading about different issues relating to friendships and romantic relationships on the Relationships page. I collected all the top tips and the Overheard part of the letters page – where readers would write in with things they had overheard while they were out and about – always made me laugh.

 

Bella in the 1990s

Bella in the 1990s

 

 

The Secret I Must Share was an absolute drop-everything-and-read feature where people talked about secrets they probably wouldn’t even tell their best friend. The very first one I read was about a mother who had encouraged her young son to steal before he could even walk – at eight he had become a real handful. Then there was the woman who had been having an affair with her American colleague for twelve years. People often used to say that the stories in the ‘Secret’ pages were made up. I don’t know if they were or not but I do know that they made very entertaining reading.

And oh my goodness, I LOVED THE FICTION PAGES! There would always be two stories each week. One would be a longer length romantic story and the other was my ultimate favourite, Mini Mystery which always featured the silhouette of a man with a magnifying glass as part of it’s logo and was typically a tale with a twist – which is my favourite type of tale. When I was fifteen, my English teacher read a short story I wrote and said that that was exactly the kind of ‘tale with a twist’ that she was trying to get out of her sixth formers. Well, perhaps they should have started reading Bella at twelve too!

 

Bella, as I used to know and love it.

Bella, as I used to know and love it.

 

I loved Bella‘s ‘realness’. It didn’t overdo the celebrity phenomenon and contained just the right amount of celebrity news. Bella was primarily about real people with real stories. Another plus point was that the cover star was always an unknown model rather than a famous face, which indicated that this was a magazine for ‘every woman.’ When I first started reading Bella, it was very much a non-colour magazine, with many of it’s features in black and white but nonetheless the magazine was far from bland or dated, although the introduction of colour photos was a welcome addition and for years very little about the magazine changed. Bella stuck to the format that readers knew and loved.

I can’t remember when I stopped buying Bella. It was definitely more than a decade ago. I know I remember thinking that it just wasn’t the same. Don’t get me wrong – I know that change can be necessary in order to keep things fresh and exciting rather than to stick to the same old format and allow things to go stale. But when the old format is a winning one, are so many changes really necessary?

Nostalgia took over last week when I decided to buy the latest copy of Bella. The first thing I noticed was that there were photos of five – that’s right, FIVE – celebrities on the cover alone. This proved to be telling. The first thirteen pages were dedicated to famous faces. This was then followed by several more pages of celebrity related features. True there were some real life stories but not nearly enough. All of my favourite features were long gone and worst of all, so were the fiction pages. In the ‘old days,’ I’d spend a good proportion of time reading Bella cover to cover. Now I could read it in well under an hour. The glossy, revamped version is definitely a far cry from what it used to be. Even the paper it’s printed on is different and there are way too many advertisements. I suspect that the main aim is to appeal to a more younger audience rather than those who have faithfully read Bella for years. But remember, I started buying the old-school Bella when I was twelve years old. How much younger would you like your audience to be?

 

The copy of Bella I recently bought

The copy of Bella I recently bought

 

The Bella I used to know was from 20 years ago so I understand that magazines have to reinvent themselves a little according to demand and changing times. However, Bella is now almost unrecognisable: it has gone from having varied content containing a bit of everything, recipes; readers stories; fiction; crafts; health; beauty; home design and more, to -and I’m really sorry to say it – a bland, uninteresting, watered down version of a celeb magazine. In fact it is now like every other women’s magazine out there and no longer stands out from the crowd. It’s lost it’s unique charm and appeal and has nothing different to offer.

I’ve read reviews concerning the ‘new’ Bella and it seems as though a lot of ex-readers are echoing my sentiments. It would be fantastic if you could bring back at least a few of the old faves and I would definitely love to see the fiction pages back where they belong. This may seem hard to believe but not everyone is interested in what celebs are getting up to or what they’re wearing. Most of us are actually bored with celeb news. Don’t believe me? Just check out the reviews. The irony is that magazine sales must be good otherwise the magazine would have folded a long time ago. But I’m pretty sure that many of those purchasing Bella are not the older readership. Anyone who has read Bella in the past and compared it to the more modern version will definitely see the difference in quality.

 

Bella from 1988. Bring it back Ed - you know you want to!

Bella from 1988. Bring it back Ed – you know you want to!

 

I was inspired to write this letter after a reader urged fellow (or former) readers to write to the editor and complain in a bid to bring back the old look Bella which we miss dearly. However, as much as we want that, I can’t see it happening which is very sad. Publishers seem to think that fashion and celebrity sell and maybe it does… but it’s not for everyone. I’m so glad I grew up in an era where we weren’t all so celeb-mad and our every move wasn’t dictated by what famous people we were never likely to meet were doing. I’m from the school of if ‘it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,’ so the total revamp, in my opinion, was unnecessary but clearly not everyone feels the same way. This letter is just my way of letting you know how much your old readership miss the old Bella… and how we have treasured memories of our once favourite read!

Angel

gingham-apron-pie-lady2

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comfort Food #9: Summer Pudding

sp1

It’s summer and the supermarkets are full of seasonal fruit which make an appearance during the brief summer months before they disappear off supermarket shelves. Cherries, raspberries, strawberries, blackcurrants… just perfect for a lovely summer pudding.

sp2

I think I was probably about five when I first came across a photograph of a delicious looking summer pudding in my mum’s The Cookery Year cookbook. At that age I was a very picky eater who wasn’t happy unless I was stuffing my face with an ample supply of chocolate. So how strange that I should be so enthralled by what is essentially a fruit pudding! I think it was the colours that did it. I was fascinated by the shock of magenta and gorgeous berry tones that made this dessert so appealing which contrasted with the crowning glory that was light, fluffy whipped cream.

imagesCAX2PBIY

Summer pudding is a popular, traditional British dessert although it’s origins are unclear. The earliest published summer pudding recipe was published in 1902 by S. Beaty-Pownall however this dessert could have existed since the nineteenth century. It is made by lining a deep dish with sliced white bread before being filled with assorted berries. It is then topped off with a final slice of bread, soaked in the juices of the soft fruit and left overnight before being turned out onto a plate.

sp5

It is unknown exactly who, why, when or where summer pudding was invented. One possibility is that it was a summer substitute for the heavy, stodgy suet puddings that were popular in winter during Victorian England.
It’s also possible that summer pudding could have been served in health farms where people went to be cleansed and aided in weight loss. Then there’s the belief that it was served in hospitals to the old and infirm as it was easy to digest. It’s beginnings may be shrouded in mystery but summer pudding is more than just an invalid’s dessert!

sp6

It is better to make this dessert with bread that is slightly stale as this helps the bread to retain a good non-mushy texture once the juice has soaked through. It is traditionally made using raspberries, strawberries, blackcurrants and redcurrants though sometimes cherries, blueberries and any other soft fruit that is available can also be used so it’s a great way to take advantage of the fabulous fruit that’s in season – especially as it’s available for such a short time. It is then served with lashings of cream.

imagesCARSWOXR

As with most well known dishes, different variations of this pudding exist. Any variety of soft fruit can be used. Some recipes call for brioche or pannetone to be used instead of white bread. There are recipes which ask for the berries to be stewed while others use raw fruit. There is also an autumnal version of this summer classic which includes pears and plums as well as berries.

sp4

A summer pudding definitely takes me back to my childhood when I was a kid poring over mum’s cook books – at a time when I could barely read! Unfortunately it wasn’t a dessert Mum ever made for us but we did eat quite a few shop bought ones. Believe me – they’re not as great a good old fashioned homemade pudding whipped up from scratch. And the great thing about a summer pudding is that as impressive looking (and tasting!) as it is, it’s so simple to make. And because it’s packed full of fruit, I don’t even think of it as a pudding but one portion of my five a day!

imagesCA2H7MTI

If you fancy whipping up a summer pudding for a new generation to try and making full use of our summer fruits – while we still have them – give this recipe by Gordon Ramsay a go. It tastes amazing!

INDIVIDUAL SUMMER PUDDINGS

recipe-image-legacy-id--2375_11

Makes 8

INGREDIENTS:

1kg mixed berries (raspberries, blueberries, redcurrants, blackberries and strawberries)
50g caster sugar
4 tbsp. Crème de Cassis (or water)
800g(approx.) loaf white bread, sliced
Extra berries to serve

METHOD:

  • Strip berries from their stalks and hull strawberries.
  • Toss berries  in a non-stick saucepan with sugar and Cassis or water.
  • Heat the pan until it starts to sizzle. Cook over a medium heat until the fruits start to bleed and soften.
  • Stir gently, then cool to room temperature.
  • Strain fruit through a plastic sieve into a non-metallic bowl until the juices stop dripping.
  • Have 8 cappuccino or tea cups (about 200ml) ready.
  • Using 2 cutters (approx. 10cm and 6cm, but check against the tops and bottoms of your cups), cut out 8 bread rounds of each size.
  • Cut the crusts off 8 more slices and slice in half. These strips should be approximately the same depth as the cups.
  • Dip the small rounds of bread into the reserved juices and press into the cups.
  • Dip the straight slices in the juice and press around the sides.
  • Spoon in the fruits, pressing down with the back of a spoon to firm.
  • Dip the last of the bread rounds into the juice; press down on top. Chill overnight.
  • When ready to serve, loosen bread tops with the tip of a table knife.
  • Hold a dessert plate over the pudding, then turn upside down, shaking well.
  • The puddings should slip out easily; if not, loosen the sides gently with the knife.
  • Pour any remaining juice over the tops of puddings.
  • Decorate with the remaining fruit; serve with pouring cream, clotted cream or mascarpone.

Recipe by Gordon Ramsay from Good Food magazine, August 2006

gingham-apron-pie-lady2.jpg

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Down Memory Lane On A Milk Float!

Milk glorious milk

Milk glorious milk

Hubby and I were on our way to work a couple of days ago, when we spotted a milk float. At a risk of sounding like a couple of people who don’t get out much – and maybe we need to after this – but we got all excited! Neither of us could remember the last time we saw a milkman doing the rounds on his milk float, when as kids we used to see them every morning. Furthermore, Hubby said he didn’t think milkmen existed in the States any more (if you’re a milkman in America, please feel free to prove us wrong!)

Milk as I remember it

Milk as I remember it

When I was a kid growing up in the 1980s, it was as common to see a pint of milk on someone’s doorstep as it is to see someone yacking away into their mobile phone today. My mum always used to ask the milk man to deliver several pints a week, and I remember her leaving the empty bottles on our doorstep for him to collect as well as the occasional note she would roll up and pop into one of the bottles when she needed to amend the order. And of course milkmen used to deliver products other than milk including eggs, bread, cheese and other dairy items. They were pretty much a corner shop on wheels! And they were also a huge help to stay at home mums with very young children who perhaps couldn’t pop down to the shops as often as they needed to.

Milk as we know it today

Milk as we know it today

Today, even though milk men are still driving around in their milk floats, they are few and far between. Perhaps with supermarkets open twenty four hours a day and other local shops open even on a Sunday, most people don’t think it’s such a struggle to pick up a pint of milk themselves, which is quite ironic considering we live in an age where we like to have everything done for us.

Milkround

Milkround

However, most people realise that they could save themselves a few pennies by nipping down to the supermarket to pick up some milk. Furthermore, the introduction of long life milk; adequate packaging and good refrigeration means that it’s not necessary for the milkman to have to deliver milk to your door every morning. There’s also the possibility of milk being taken from doorsteps, especially today when certain people are likely to walk off with anything that’s not nailed down. On a more sinister note, the reason we stopped using the services of the local milkman was after our house was broken into. The neighbours were convinced it was the milk left on the doorstep for too long that gave away the fact that no one was at home at the time. So Mum cancelled all future orders and took herself off down the shops if ever we needed milk. A sad end to many happy years of seeing our cheery milkman! I suppose all of these factors have contributed in the dramatic decrease of milk delivery people.

Milk float

Milk float

And seeing a milk float always reminds me of Open All Hours, a BBC comedy starring Ronnie Barker and David Jason of which my dad was a huge fan. Jason’s character Granville, is romantically involved with the local milk woman and he waits for her to go by in her milk float before dashing outside to talk to her. So milk floats remind me of the happy times we spent as a family watching Granville’s escapades.

Arkwright and Granville in Open All Hours

Arkwright and Granville in Open All Hours

The milkman and his float is a big part of my childhood memories. Hubby’s too. According to the Dairy UK website, there are five thousand milkmen and women today who deliver to around 2.5 million homes. When you consider what the population of the UK is, those figures are alarmingly low. It’s a pity that milkmen seem to be disappearing and I would hate to lose yet another iconic symbol of my childhood in the 80s. Furthermore, we live in an era where ther’s something of a green revolution so surely environmentally friendly reusable bottles are a great idea. Hopefully more people will start to use milk delivery services again – but I have a feeling it’s going to take more than nostalgia to float people’s milk floats!

gingham-apron-pie-lady2

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 6, 2013 in Old School Stuff, Products

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 
rock, metal and more

All about music and other entertainment

Murder Mystery Blog

Corporate Murder Mysteries

LHB Blog

A girl, a blog and a cactus named Pudding

Tangled Up In Music

Music Reviews

Every number one

Journey through all the songs that topped the charts

YOU & HOME

Deco · Gastro · Style

vinnieh

Movie reviews and anything else that comes to mind

The Artisan Duck

Ramblings from my crafty corner.

Suburbiakid's Blog

Teen Ramblings from a suburban kid in the 1970's

My Eighties

Remembering what it was like to grow up in the '80s. Twitter: @MyEighties

Something Definitely Happened

A vintage fashion and style blog

Health News Library

Your On-Line Source for Alternative Health Care Solutions

My Berkeley Bowl

Making my way through the exotic fruits and vegetables of the Berkeley Bowl aisles, one delicious recipe at a time

Fitness on Toast

A Fitness Blog about Gym Training, Sport Fashion, Healthy Nutrition and Active Travel – By Faya Nilsson

Insidethelifeofmoi

An eccentric blogger with a pen and a thousand ideas

Cinema Parrot Disco

Musings on Mainly Movies from a Table 9 Mutant

Radical Departures

Infrequent blabbering about films, music, telly, beauty, Sheffield and other random stuff

goingplaceslivinglife

Travel, Food, and Slices of Life

~~~ lovely buns ~~~

~simple, delicious, beautiful, scrumptious bits and bobs to eat~

The Nostalgia Blog

Your source for everything retro. 70s, 80s, 90s and beyond!

Charlotte Fox

Style, Beauty, Tips, Tricks & Travel

The Sconnoisseurs

Recipes and Recommendations

Midday With Mindy

Encouraging Words From A Young Wife :)

Enjoy by Paula

be happy, healthy & radiate positivity

%d bloggers like this: